Tag Archives: motivation

We Aren’t the Brave Ones… a collection of novels showcasing what true bravery looks like in our public schools.

If you haven’t been living under a rock and are at all connected to the educational world- whether that be in a school, on Facebook, Twitter, or “the news”- the discord, tension, and frustrations are obvious and apparent. Some, including myself, could even call the political “educational” commotion dangerous.

With everything being said (or not being said) about the state and future of our public school system, I am lead to believe that we are operating under a few systemic flaws. First, many lawmakers do not know what truly goes on inside all schools across America. They do not understand the populations and how different those populations can range from school-to-school. We are racially and ethnically diverse, cognitively diverse, demographically diverse, and combating gender norms.

Our schools are full of students going against the grain, forging new territory, and setting examples for bravery, compassion, and empathy for their peers.

On the topic of discrimination, something that has been brought to light in current political hearings, the delegation of federal dollars to public and charter schools has been spotlighted. While I have some thoughts on this, strong thoughts I might add, the purpose of this post is to highlight stories of bravery and compassion among diverse, minority populations in some regard. To me, “minority populations” is a phrase that can stand for a multitude of student groups. ESL kids, African American students, students receiving Special Education services, and refugee populations as well as many others can be considered a minority population.

Before getting into a few books that highlight these diverse students within the school, I want to share a little story about middle school and what true bravery looks like.

There is a student at my school and we can call him T. T comes to school every day properly in his uniform. He follows the school rules as best as he can. He attempts to make friends, but due to a cognitive barrier he is labeled as different. I think he is able to understand that he is different in some way, but he usually doesn’t let it phase him. He puts on his headphones and dances with the biggest smile at school socials. He asks girls to dance, and they willingly oblige if just for a moment. He made the school basketball team and showed up early to every practice showcasing his dedication and commitment to the team even if he only recieved playing time when the scoreboard could afford it. He is the definition of bravery in a middle school where you can be eaten alive if your weak spots are shown. He is a teacher to his peers guiding them in the virtues of dedication, perseverance, and citizenship. Needless to say, it was a task to hold back a few tears when he walked across our gym floor to accept an award at our yearly Awards Ceremony today. 

All students, no matter what, deserve a chance at a true inclusive education not only for the opportunities that are available to them but for so much more. We all learn from each other in many different ways. T is as much of a teacher and leader to other students as “mainstream” students are to him. It would be a true loss for all to begin to incorporate discriminatory policies into our public education.

The following novels are stellar options to incorporate into your summer book clubs, summer reading list, classroom or home libraries, or classroom curriculum especially if critical literacy and inclusive educational ideals are at the forefront of your interests.

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Wonder by R.J Palacio- An oldie-but-a-goodie, this novel will teach everyone a thing or two about bravery. With the new movie trailer and release around the corner, this text is sure to catch quite a bit of attention again! Auggie, the protagonist, suffers a slew of medical issues leaving him with quite a few facial deformities and the subject of a lot of scrutiny. This heart-warming and heart-wrenching story allows readers to see into the daily struggle of someone who is different and the lessons he is able to teach his peers through his perseverance.

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Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt- Ally can’t read but she is clever enough to hide her inability across schools and years. Ally’s struggle with dyslexia and reading mirrors so many students who don’t ask for help or assume they are simply “dumb.” This uplifting story resonates with many young teens in that one single aspect of themselves is not their whole identity and also asking for help when needed is bravery in and of itself.

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Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Patillo Beals- This gripping memoir follows Melba, one of the “Little Rock Nine”, and her tense account of integration into the public school system. This story reiterates the importance of the court ruling “separate is not equal” and provides a timely reminder of why inclusive, integrated schools are imperative for all to attend. In this memoir, Melba faces the worst circumstances in her quest for equal, public education including physical violence as well as verbal violence. Combating the challenge of the horrific conditions, she perseveres though it all and never backs down on her right to an equal, integrated education.

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Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper- Melody is unlike all of her peers at school in her integrated (or inclusive) classroom. She is bound to a chair and cannot talk or write. Through Melody’s perspective readers learn that she is brilliant, has a photogenic memory that allows her to remember every single detail of her life, and is bound by her medical condition cerebral palsy. Melody is determined to prove to all, including her doctors and peers that dismissed her as severely mentally challenged, that she is not who they think she is. This is a story about determination and that people are way beyond what they look like or seem on the surface.

All of these stories tell tales of true bravery and determination whichy would not have occurred if the students were not allowed in schools due to some reasoning or policy. What books are you adding to your bookshelves this summer? Have you read and books lately that exemplify “bravery” in the school? What new books should I add to my collection to read? I would love to hear from you!

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Filed under books, Education, literature, middle school, middle school teaching, teach, teacher, YA Literature, YAL, young adult literautre

If you liked “Hunger Games”…

You should really read Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard. You may like it even more, as I did! This novel is fairly new and comes with a few sequels, which is great for classroom reading such as Sustained Silent Reading or DEAR! Kids love a good series and it keeps them occupied for a few months of reading time during class.

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Here is the basic run-down: a lowly girl happens upon circumstances that thrust her into the court of royals whom are significantly different than her due to their “silver” blood. Here something crazy happens and she is forced to take on the identity of a “silver” costing her more than just her identity throughout the story. She ultimately has to choose a side, red or silver, and pays dearly for her choice. The final ending is very surprising and one I truly didn’t see coming! However, in retrospect all of the foreshadowing was present just difficult to make sense of.

Red Queen shares similar motifs to Hunger Games especially in the rebellious attitudes towards a suffocating governing force as well as the love triangle that multiple stories seem to have currently, think Gale/Peeta or Jacob/Edward. As much as I do not like novels where the strong “heroine” seems to fall into the love trap, RQ kept much of the integrity of the female lead allowing her to progress the story based upon the conflict with the governing force rather than the conflict of who to choose to love.

The only qualm I have with this novel is the lack of in depth character development for a majority of the ones seen in the spotlight. I wished I got more through Cal and Mere (our heroine) could have used some more layers as well. Some of the focal characters besides these two lacked depth but in an extrememly purposeful way. Read to the end and you’ll see what I am hinting at. With a twist as great as this one, I don’t want to give anything away!

This is a great read for the middle grades due to the lack of adult language, themes, and sexuality. At times, it is harder to find engaging books for higher level readers in the middle grades that is still deemed “PG.” This is definitely a good pick, I enjoyed it even as an adult!

Take a read and let me know what you think in the comments below!

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Filed under books, literature, teach, YA Literature, YAL, young adult literautre

Novels to Motivate African American Males

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By far, one of my greatest struggles this school year lies within motivating my African American boys to read independently during their required SSR time. I know much of this struggle was a fault of my own. These students were unengaged in my bookshelves as well as the school library, not finding the popular sci-fi novels such as The 5th Wave or John Green texts “interesting.” At the beginning of the year, almost every book on my bookshelf featured a white protagonist and became unrelatable to these students. Therefore, one of my professional goals was to research this demographic and find novels that my boys really wanted to read. If you read my last post, the Allison Van Diepen novels proved sufficient in this matter. However I needed more than four novels could provide, both time wise as well as variety.

Many recurring themes appear among the wide body of research regarding adolescent African-American males. These themes identify the struggles these males have, “among the most prominent are issues of self-concept, self-efficacy, and identity development” (Tatum, Literacy Practices from African-American Male Adolescents, p.6). Adolescent African-American males, as do many students, struggle with finding their identity in the world starting in the early middle-school years. It is essential for these students to be able to have access to literature reflecting their background and current struggles.

Literature that influences student motivation, “address[es] a range of experiences, including stories about teen wresting with issues of acceptance based on family gender preferences, ethnicity, immigration issues, and gang and cult membership” (Moss, Voices from the Middle, Volume 19, p.39). Readers, especially the African-American male, have more motivation for reading a text, “contain[ing] well-portrayed authentic main characters who grapple in realistic ways with the challenges of today’s world” (Moss, Voices from the Middle, Volume 19, p.41). Students should have access to highly engaging texts and literature, this in turn allows a lens to explore their own identity and persona through characters that mirror their current lives.

There are many conditions necessary for literacy development with reluctant or struggling readers, including the need for student engagement in the text. In terms of engagement, which corresponds with motivation, “reading intervention classes should be filled with high-interest books that march a wide range of students’ reading interest” to foster a true wanting to explore a literary text. (Wozniak, Voices from the Middle, Volume 19, p.17). Educators, as I have, will likely find success with reading motivation when including texts in their classroom embracing students’ ethnic group identities. These specific texts could enhance literacy experiences and correspondingly could increase reading achievement and standardized testing scores.

Overall, research indicates males become more motivated with a literary text when the basis is upon connecting or making the literacy life-like and relatable. This form of connecting to the text, or seeing the text as life-like, allows students to mirror their own life in the story in some context. The emphasis on including historical literary and traditional texts, especially with the African-American male population, is critical to engagement and motivation within a chosen or class-taught text. It is imperative that educators are “honoring and respecting students’ cultural backgrounds” and integrating historical and traditional African-American texts (Flowers, Urban African-American Students, p.166). This is central to actively acknowledging the various cultures.

Historical accounts of the earlier African-American life display the “types, characteristics, and roles of writing embraced by African-American males as they sought to protect their dignity in a racist society” which is still current and relevant in student’s lives today (Tatum, Literacy Practices for African-American Male Adolescents, p.13). Students can analyze historical writing to interpret how politics, race, class, and sex were woven together in the works of writers and themes of literacy and liberation are evident among various historical texts, in which both are placed heavy emphasis upon. African-American males learned to read and write to provide different perspectives on current events and historical emphases leading the actions in their lives. Integrating Fredrick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and Harriet Ann Jacobs Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl provides students with the urgent and life-changing reasons to pursue and become proficient in reading and writing applicable in their own lives as well. Types of selections as these, which honor and respect the African-American traditional texts, open up a classroom for cultural safety, identity discovery, and rich discussions on the value of literacy in life.

In my next post, I will provide specific examples of texts I used in my classroom to supplement traditional literature to engage these students. Be on the lookout for that in the coming weeks! If you have had success with specific texts in this demographic, I would love to know and collaborate with you!

 

-Stephanie Branson

References:

Flowers, T. A., and L. A. Flowers. “Factors Affecting Urban African American High School Students’ Achievement in Reading.” Urban Education 43.2 (2008): 154-71. Web. 1 May 2016.

Moss, Barbara. “Fitting In or Standing Out: Finding Your Place in the World of Adolescence.” Voices from the Middle 19.2 (2011): 39-41. NCTE. Web. 1 May 2016.

Tatum, Alfred. “Helping Struggling Readers: Reading for Their Life.” YouTube. Heinemann Publishing, 30 Mar. 2010. Web. 02 May 2016.

Tatum, Alfred W. “Literacy Practices For African-American Male Adolescents.” Students at the Center. Jobs for the Future, Mar. 2012. Web. 1 May 2016.

Wozniak, Cheryl L. “Reading and Talking about Books: A Critical Foundation for Intervention.” Voices From the Middle. NCTE, Dec. 2011. Web. 1 May 2016

 

 

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June 2, 2016 · 8:47 am