Tag Archives: advocate

We Aren’t the Brave Ones… a collection of novels showcasing what true bravery looks like in our public schools.

If you haven’t been living under a rock and are at all connected to the educational world- whether that be in a school, on Facebook, Twitter, or “the news”- the discord, tension, and frustrations are obvious and apparent. Some, including myself, could even call the political “educational” commotion dangerous.

With everything being said (or not being said) about the state and future of our public school system, I am lead to believe that we are operating under a few systemic flaws. First, many lawmakers do not know what truly goes on inside all schools across America. They do not understand the populations and how different those populations can range from school-to-school. We are racially and ethnically diverse, cognitively diverse, demographically diverse, and combating gender norms.

Our schools are full of students going against the grain, forging new territory, and setting examples for bravery, compassion, and empathy for their peers.

On the topic of discrimination, something that has been brought to light in current political hearings, the delegation of federal dollars to public and charter schools has been spotlighted. While I have some thoughts on this, strong thoughts I might add, the purpose of this post is to highlight stories of bravery and compassion among diverse, minority populations in some regard. To me, “minority populations” is a phrase that can stand for a multitude of student groups. ESL kids, African American students, students receiving Special Education services, and refugee populations as well as many others can be considered a minority population.

Before getting into a few books that highlight these diverse students within the school, I want to share a little story about middle school and what true bravery looks like.

There is a student at my school and we can call him T. T comes to school every day properly in his uniform. He follows the school rules as best as he can. He attempts to make friends, but due to a cognitive barrier he is labeled as different. I think he is able to understand that he is different in some way, but he usually doesn’t let it phase him. He puts on his headphones and dances with the biggest smile at school socials. He asks girls to dance, and they willingly oblige if just for a moment. He made the school basketball team and showed up early to every practice showcasing his dedication and commitment to the team even if he only recieved playing time when the scoreboard could afford it. He is the definition of bravery in a middle school where you can be eaten alive if your weak spots are shown. He is a teacher to his peers guiding them in the virtues of dedication, perseverance, and citizenship. Needless to say, it was a task to hold back a few tears when he walked across our gym floor to accept an award at our yearly Awards Ceremony today. 

All students, no matter what, deserve a chance at a true inclusive education not only for the opportunities that are available to them but for so much more. We all learn from each other in many different ways. T is as much of a teacher and leader to other students as “mainstream” students are to him. It would be a true loss for all to begin to incorporate discriminatory policies into our public education.

The following novels are stellar options to incorporate into your summer book clubs, summer reading list, classroom or home libraries, or classroom curriculum especially if critical literacy and inclusive educational ideals are at the forefront of your interests.

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Wonder by R.J Palacio- An oldie-but-a-goodie, this novel will teach everyone a thing or two about bravery. With the new movie trailer and release around the corner, this text is sure to catch quite a bit of attention again! Auggie, the protagonist, suffers a slew of medical issues leaving him with quite a few facial deformities and the subject of a lot of scrutiny. This heart-warming and heart-wrenching story allows readers to see into the daily struggle of someone who is different and the lessons he is able to teach his peers through his perseverance.

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Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt- Ally can’t read but she is clever enough to hide her inability across schools and years. Ally’s struggle with dyslexia and reading mirrors so many students who don’t ask for help or assume they are simply “dumb.” This uplifting story resonates with many young teens in that one single aspect of themselves is not their whole identity and also asking for help when needed is bravery in and of itself.

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Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Patillo Beals- This gripping memoir follows Melba, one of the “Little Rock Nine”, and her tense account of integration into the public school system. This story reiterates the importance of the court ruling “separate is not equal” and provides a timely reminder of why inclusive, integrated schools are imperative for all to attend. In this memoir, Melba faces the worst circumstances in her quest for equal, public education including physical violence as well as verbal violence. Combating the challenge of the horrific conditions, she perseveres though it all and never backs down on her right to an equal, integrated education.

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Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper- Melody is unlike all of her peers at school in her integrated (or inclusive) classroom. She is bound to a chair and cannot talk or write. Through Melody’s perspective readers learn that she is brilliant, has a photogenic memory that allows her to remember every single detail of her life, and is bound by her medical condition cerebral palsy. Melody is determined to prove to all, including her doctors and peers that dismissed her as severely mentally challenged, that she is not who they think she is. This is a story about determination and that people are way beyond what they look like or seem on the surface.

All of these stories tell tales of true bravery and determination whichy would not have occurred if the students were not allowed in schools due to some reasoning or policy. What books are you adding to your bookshelves this summer? Have you read and books lately that exemplify “bravery” in the school? What new books should I add to my collection to read? I would love to hear from you!

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Filed under books, Education, literature, middle school, middle school teaching, teach, teacher, YA Literature, YAL, young adult literautre

Picture Books for Social Justice

This election season has brought a whole new slew of questions, many without answers. Many of our students do not know how to comprehend or even have the prior knowledge or experiential basis to start to form their own ideas on what they think is “right” or issues that they agree or disagree with. Thus the need to teach, explicitly teach, social justice is paramount in order to help students shape their beliefs, values, and contributions to our society. Without the basic tools of literacy, students will not be able to advocate for themselves and their beliefs in a way that is meaningful and purposeful to their futures.

Social justice can be simply defined, although it is not a “simple” term in any regards, as any oppressing social condition to a group of people. This is included but not limited to race, ethnicity, sex, gender identification, religious beliefs, poverty, and much more.

Picture books can be a critical resource in order to build upon students’ knowledge base on what social justice and social oppression looks like, feels like, and the repercussions that follow. Picture books can and should be used with all ages, including at the  middle and high school level. These books have the ability to increase student engagement and allow students to make multimodal connections with the text. The study below details the importance of utilizing picture books with students in the upper grades.

Reiker, M. (2011). The Use of Picture Books in a High School Classroom: A Qualitative Case Study. Masters Thesis. Rollins College.

I have used the following picture books to varying degrees in order to teach on social justice and engage my students in conversations surrounding oppression, the scope of authority, and when we should “rise up” and advocate for what we believe in.

Baseball Saved Us Ken Mochizuki

This book is wonderfully illustrated and centers around the children living in the Japanese Internment camps during World War II. This topic is rarely talked about in schools and is very eye-opening for students. Generally, students are saddened at the camp living conditions and empathetically align themselves with the children at the forefront of this text.

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Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation       Duncan Tonatiuh 

This text is a poignant reminder of the segregation that was present in schools prior to Desegregation. This text provides a new lens for many students when thinking about segregation due to the protagonist being of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage. This book leads to rich discussions regarding race and the oppression that minority groups have faced in the past and are still facing today.

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How Many Days to America? A Thanksgiving Story Eve Bunting

Eve Bunting is a wonderful author who writes striking books that cover a variety of social topics. I often use these texts as discussion starters or to provide some background knowledge for particular themes, projects, or novels. I also love her text Fly Away Home, which is such a heartbreaking story of poverty that rings true with so many students.

This particular text follows the journey of a family, possibly from the Caribbean area, in a small fishing boat to America. This book paints such a tragic picture of a refugee and opens my students’ eyes to the gravity of reality and what real people and families have to go through to find a better life. This text could provide as a starting point to talking about the events in Syria and the current immigration conversations happening nationally.

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What books are you using with your children or students? What kinds of conversations are you having? As always, I would love suggestions!

In the following weeks, I will be posting about novels, non-fiction, and memoirs that can be used as a lens into social justice topics. Stay tuned!

 

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October 10, 2016 · 3:14 am